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File #: 15-3794    Version: 1 Name: RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING CALLING UPON THE CHICAGO POLICE DEPARTMENT TO COMMUNICATE AND COORDINATE WITH THE COOK COUNTY SHERIFF’S POLICE TO ADDRESS ISSUES RELATED TO THE PRACTICE OF “STOP AND FRISK,” BY REVIEWING THE POLICIES OF THE SHERIFF RELATED TO MOTOR
Type: Resolution Status: Approved
File created: 6/3/2015 In control: Criminal Justice Committee
On agenda: 6/10/2015 Final action: 7/1/2015
Title: PROPOSED RESOLUTION RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING CALLING UPON THE CHICAGO POLICE DEPARTMENT TO COMMUNICATE AND COORDINATE WITH THE COOK COUNTY SHERIFF'S POLICE TO ADDRESS ISSUES RELATED TO THE PRACTICE OF "STOP AND FRISK," BY REVIEWING THE POLICIES OF THE SHERIFF RELATED TO MOTOR VEHICLE STOPS, SEARCHES AND SEIZURES, SUPERVISORY RANK AND RESPONSIBILITY, AND DETENTIONS WHEREAS, despite the fact that the nation's attention has turned to police practices because of high profile killings, concerns about policing extend beyond the use of force and into the everyday interactions of police with community members; and, WHEREAS, in black and Latino communities, these everyday interactions are often a "Stop and Frisk"; and, WHEREAS, under the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), officers are allowed to stop you if the officer has reasonable suspicion that you have been, are, or are about to be engaged in criminal activity. Once you are stopped, if an officer ...
Sponsors: RICHARD R. BOYKIN
title
PROPOSED RESOLUTION

RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING CALLING UPON THE CHICAGO POLICE DEPARTMENT TO COMMUNICATE AND COORDINATE WITH THE COOK COUNTY SHERIFF'S POLICE TO ADDRESS ISSUES RELATED TO THE PRACTICE OF "STOP AND FRISK," BY REVIEWING THE POLICIES OF THE SHERIFF RELATED TO MOTOR VEHICLE STOPS, SEARCHES AND SEIZURES, SUPERVISORY RANK AND RESPONSIBILITY, AND DETENTIONS

WHEREAS, despite the fact that the nation's attention has turned to police practices because of high profile killings, concerns about policing extend beyond the use of force and into the everyday interactions of police with community members; and,

WHEREAS, in black and Latino communities, these everyday interactions are often a "Stop and Frisk"; and,

WHEREAS, under the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), officers are allowed to stop you if the officer has reasonable suspicion that you have been, are, or are about to be engaged in criminal activity. Once you are stopped, if an officer has reasonable suspicion that you are dangerous and have a weapon, the officer can frisk you, including ordering you to put your hands on a wall or car, and running his or her hands over your body; and,

WHEREAS, a report on "Stop and Frisk" police practices by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Illinois, published this past Spring, contains troubling signs that the Chicago Police Department has a current practice of unlawfully using stop and frisk; and,

WHEREAS, "Stop and Frisk" is disproportionately concentrated in the black community. Last month's ACLU Report found that black Chicagoans were subjected to 72% of all stops, though they constitute just 32% of the city's population; and,

WHEREAS, the ACLU of Illinois, comparing stops to population, found that Chicagoans were stopped more than four times as often as New Yorkers at the height of New York City's stop and frisk practice; and,

WHEREAS, the abuse of stop and frisk is a violation of individual ...

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