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File #: 16-2568    Version: 1 Name: RECOGNIZING ROSA E. MARTINEZ-COLON - PAVING THE WAY FOR 25 YEARS
Type: Consent Calendar Resolution Status: Approved
File created: 4/4/2016 In control: Board of Commissioners
On agenda: 4/13/2016 Final action: 4/13/2016
Title: PROPOSED RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING ROSA E. MARTINEZ-COLON - PAVING THE WAY FOR 25 YEARS WHEREAS, a Puerto Rican native, Rosa E. Martinez-Colon's first experience with HIV/AIDS was when a neighborhood friend died from the virus. Soon after, more friends experienced the devastating symptoms of HIV/AIDS. At this time, Rosa did not know just how much her life's work would impact the lives of thousands of people affected by HIV/AIDS; WHEREAS, Rosa was one of several community activists, service providers and HIV+ individuals who responded to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Latino community in 1991 by founding CALOR (Comprensi?n y Apoyo a Latinos en Oposici?n al Retrovirus) along with co-founder Omar Lopez. Rosa was approached by Saul Maravilla, a classmate, looking for a space a group of Latinos needed to meet on this vital topic, Rosa opened the doors to the first support group;' WHEREAS, Rosa was invited to attend training offered by the now defunct Stop AIDS Chicago on Women and ...
Sponsors: LUIS ARROYO JR
title
PROPOSED RESOLUTION

RECOGNIZING ROSA E. MARTINEZ-COLON - PAVING THE WAY FOR 25 YEARS

WHEREAS, a Puerto Rican native, Rosa E. Martinez-Colon's first experience with HIV/AIDS was when a neighborhood friend died from the virus. Soon after, more friends experienced the devastating symptoms of HIV/AIDS. At this time, Rosa did not know just how much her life's work would impact the lives of thousands of people affected by HIV/AIDS;

WHEREAS, Rosa was one of several community activists, service providers and HIV+ individuals who responded to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Latino community in 1991 by founding CALOR (Comprensi?n y Apoyo a Latinos en Oposici?n al Retrovirus) along with co-founder Omar Lopez. Rosa was approached by Saul Maravilla, a classmate, looking for a space a group of Latinos needed to meet on this vital topic, Rosa opened the doors to the first support group;'

WHEREAS, Rosa was invited to attend training offered by the now defunct Stop AIDS Chicago on Women and HIV. It was here that Rosa would find her calling. Rosa was set on her path by the lack of information offered to women on the virus, even though women were as heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS as men were. Spanish material on the virus was almost non-existent. Rosa knew she had to change this;

WHEREAS, with the need for more support groups and resources for the Latino communities, CALOR's mission, was to continue offering support groups for Latinos affected by the HIV virus and for Hispanic HIV/AIDS service providers. The emphasis was put on providing intervention initiatives and building support systems for people recently diagnosed. In 1993, with the help of grants, the organization began offering case management and mental health services. Later, essential prevention initiatives were developed along with employment placement services;

WHEREAS, in 1997, CALOR merged with Anixter Center, a well-respected and established provider of services for people with disabilities of a...

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